Fireside 2.1 (https://fireside.fm) In This Labyrinth: Justice From the Heart of The Phantom Of The Opera Blog https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles Sat, 22 Aug 2020 18:00:00 -0400 In This Labyrinth: Justice From the Heart of The Phantom Of The Opera Blog en-us Follow-Up to My Review of Lazare! https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/lazare-sources Sat, 22 Aug 2020 18:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com 7e3871df-4f84-4f9f-b36e-84edc940c7b1 Where you can find the book I reviewed in Episode 20, along with some links to cool background info. Sorry this has taken so long to get posted! A, things have been busy, and B, I wanted to give the PSA some space to be noticed first.

Anyway, below you can see where you can find the book I reviewed in Episode 20 - Lazare: Gaston Leroux’s Continued Investigation Concerning The Phantom Of The Opera, as well as sources for some of the historical background that I talked about to set the novel in context. And as I said in the episode, I highly recommend folks check the book out as it really is excellent!

First of all, then, you can find it from the author’s website. https://ketorwood.com

Plus, of course, you can also find it on the Kindle store! Searching for the title or the author, K. E. Torwood, should find it. I’d put a link, but of course, which Kindle store depends on your location! But I know I’ve seen it on the Canadian store, and I think it should be available in the U.S. and U.K. too. I hope so!

In addition, you can follow the author on Twitter at @KETorwood.

And because Lazare is a Queer sequel to the Leroux novel, here’s some information about the history of LGBTQIA+ rights in France. Really interesting! I learned some stuff I didn’t know there!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_rights_in_France

Also, because the Franco-Prussian war plays such an important role as backdrop in the novel, here’s some background information on that, too. Again really interesting, especially the long-term social and political effects of the war!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franco-Prussian_War

Finally, and again because it plays such an important role in the novel, here’s some information on the “Dreyfus Affair” that rocked France from 1896 through 1906. And as you’ll read, it continued to have huge social and political ripple-effects for decades after that in France and beyond!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreyfus_affair

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Info from the PSA on Saving the #BrilliantOriginal! https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/info-on-saving-the-brilliant-original Fri, 07 Aug 2020 05:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com 309af0d2-e57b-4207-9e3e-a3c0d3eb3911 Sources and links from my PSA in the effort to #SaveTheBrilliantOriginal #PhantomoftheOpera! So here are some articles from the powers that be about what’s been happening with the flagship production, particularly the London one. They’re listed more or less in chronological order.

https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Andrew-Lloyd-Webber-Responds-to-Rumor-That-West-End-Production-of-PHANTOM-Will-Be-Revamped-20200622?fbclid=IwAR3x_LC-Yqe8ClW5GM3t6uld2tX5kZE0mPr-fgVP1rEkdglqVwX62oaYT_Q

https://www.theatermania.com/london-theater/news/theater-gossip-will-west-end-phantom-of-the-opera-_91113.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=22jun2020&fbclid=IwAR29uGMxbXUFYlsXVmwcz1vsJtdtV9daxjOvG4EB0x959C8oU8XHvGnB9FM

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/phantom-of-the-opera-closing-west-end-london-a4510701.html

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/cameron-mackintosh-covid-london-theatre-west-end-a4510241.html

https://www.whatsonstage.com/london-theatre/news/phantom-opera-new-design-physical_52098.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=30July2020

And here are those Change.org petitions again for folks to sign and share!

https://www.change.org/p/cameron-mackintosh-save-the-brilliant-original-phantom-of-the-opera?fbclid=IwAR3P7J_BdCaByzAps3_Ofh4TvbpEOJK3W0ycEDNLxkVUnfDEgCSd6xsFh88

https://www.change.org/p/cameron-mackintosh-save-phantom-london?fbclid=IwAR0WRO06G32BepAvz5oRaRiCqNdwmyEXKOF9QhVeglPF9B36DLGVnvJH87A

And here’s where you can contact Cameron Mackintosh either by email or by old-fashioned snail-mail!

https://www.cameronmackintosh.com/contact

And of course, you can tweet at him at @CamMackLtd and at Andrew Lloyd Webber and RUG at @OfficialALW.

Finally, of course, no hate-mail! We just want them to know what the show means to us, how significant it is culturally, and that there is a large audience ready and waiting for the brilliant original to come back!

Oh, and the blog post for episode 20, Lazare, will be up soon. Just running a bit behind as usual! And I wantSo here are some articles from the powers that be about what’s been happening with the flagship production, particularly the London one. They’re listed more or less in chronological order.

https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Andrew-Lloyd-Webber-Responds-to-Rumor-That-West-End-Production-of-PHANTOM-Will-Be-Revamped-20200622?fbclid=IwAR3x_LC-Yqe8ClW5GM3t6uld2tX5kZE0mPr-fgVP1rEkdglqVwX62oaYT_Q

https://www.theatermania.com/london-theater/news/theater-gossip-will-west-end-phantom-of-the-opera-_91113.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=22jun2020&fbclid=IwAR29uGMxbXUFYlsXVmwcz1vsJtdtV9daxjOvG4EB0x959C8oU8XHvGnB9FM

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/phantom-of-the-opera-closing-west-end-london-a4510701.html

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/cameron-mackintosh-covid-london-theatre-west-end-a4510241.html

https://www.whatsonstage.com/london-theatre/news/phantom-opera-new-design-physical_52098.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=30July2020

And here are those Change.org petitions again for folks to sign and share!

https://www.change.org/p/cameron-mackintosh-save-the-brilliant-original-phantom-of-the-opera?fbclid=IwAR3P7J_BdCaByzAps3_Ofh4TvbpEOJK3W0ycEDNLxkVUnfDEgCSd6xsFh88

https://www.change.org/p/cameron-mackintosh-save-phantom-london?fbclid=IwAR0WRO06G32BepAvz5oRaRiCqNdwmyEXKOF9QhVeglPF9B36DLGVnvJH87A

And here’s where you can contact Cameron Mackintosh either by email or by old-fashioned snail-mail!

https://www.cameronmackintosh.com/contact

And of course, you can tweet at him at @CamMackLtd and at Andrew Lloyd Webber and RUG at @OfficialALW.

Finally, of course, no hate-mail! We just want them to know what the show means to us, how significant it is culturally, and that there iSo here are some articles from the powers that be about what’s been happening with the flagship production, particularly the London one. They’re listed more or less in chronological order.

https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Andrew-Lloyd-Webber-Responds-to-Rumor-That-West-End-Production-of-PHANTOM-Will-Be-Revamped-20200622?fbclid=IwAR3x_LC-Yqe8ClW5GM3t6uld2tX5kZE0mPr-fgVP1rEkdglqVwX62oaYT_Q

https://www.theatermania.com/london-theater/news/theater-gossip-will-west-end-phantom-of-the-opera-_91113.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=22jun2020&fbclid=IwAR29uGMxbXUFYlsXVmwcz1vsJtdtV9daxjOvG4EB0x959C8oU8XHvGnB9FM

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/phantom-of-the-opera-closing-west-end-london-a4510701.html

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/cameron-mackintosh-covid-london-theatre-west-end-a4510241.html

https://www.whatsonstage.com/london-theatre/news/phantom-opera-new-design-physical_52098.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=30July2020

And here are those Change.org petitions again for folks to sign and share!

https://www.change.org/p/cameron-mackintosh-save-the-brilliant-original-phantom-of-the-opera?fbclid=IwAR3P7J_BdCaByzAps3_Ofh4TvbpEOJK3W0ycEDNLxkVUnfDEgCSd6xsFh88

https://www.change.org/p/cameron-mackintosh-save-phantom-london?fbclid=IwAR0WRO06G32BepAvz5oRaRiCqNdwmyEXKOF9QhVeglPF9B36DLGVnvJH87A

And here’s where you can contact Cameron Mackintosh either by email or by old-fashioned snail-mail!

https://www.cameronmackintosh.com/contact

And of course, you can tweet at him at @CamMackLtd and at Andrew Lloyd Webber and RUG at @OfficialALW.

Finally, of course, no hate-mail! We just want them to know what the show means to us, how significant it is culturally, and that there is a large audience ready and waiting for the brilliant original to come back!

Oh, and the blog post for episode 20, Lazare, will be up soon. Just running a bit behind as usual! And I wanted to get this one up first.s a large audience ready and waiting for the brilliant original to come back!

Oh, and the blog post for episode 20, LSo here are some articles from the powers that be about what’s been happening with the flagship production, particularly the London one. They’re listed more or less in chronological order.

https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Andrew-Lloyd-Webber-Responds-to-Rumor-That-West-End-Production-of-PHANTOM-Will-Be-Revamped-20200622?fbclid=IwAR3x_LC-Yqe8ClW5GM3t6uld2tX5kZE0mPr-fgVP1rEkdglqVwX62oaYT_Q

https://www.theatermania.com/london-theater/news/theater-gossip-will-west-end-phantom-of-the-opera-_91113.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=22jun2020&fbclid=IwAR29uGMxbXUFYlsXVmwcz1vsJtdtV9daxjOvG4EB0x959C8oU8XHvGnB9FM

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/phantom-of-the-opera-closing-west-end-london-a4510701.html

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/cameron-mackintosh-covid-london-theatre-west-end-a4510241.html

https://www.whatsonstage.com/london-theatre/news/phantom-opera-new-design-physical_52098.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=30July2020

And here are those Change.org petitions again for folks to sign and share!

https://www.change.org/p/cameron-mackintosh-save-the-brilliant-original-phantom-of-the-opera?fbclid=IwAR3P7J_BdCaByzAps3_Ofh4TvbpEOJK3W0ycEDNLxkVUnfDEgCSd6xsFh88

https://www.change.org/p/cameron-mackintosh-save-phantom-london?fbclid=IwAR0WRO06G32BepAvz5oRaRiCqNdwmyEXKOF9QhVeglPF9B36DLGVnvJH87A

And here’s where you can contact Cameron Mackintosh either by email or by old-fashioned snail-mail!

https://www.cameronmackintosh.com/contact

And of course, you can tweet at him at @CamMackLtd and at Andrew Lloyd Webber and RUG at @OfficialALW.

Finally, of course, no hate-mail! We just want them to know what the show means to us, how significant it is culturally, and that there is a large audience ready and waiting for the brilliant original to come back!

Oh, and the blog post for episode 20, Lazare, will be up soon. Just running a bit behind as usual! And I wanted to get this one up first.

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References for episode 19- Do I Become His Prey? https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/references-for-episode-19 Thu, 16 Jul 2020 12:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com 7f23e016-6f68-4ac2-b2fe-846049c8484a The references for my discussion on violence and Transformative Justice in POTO. OK. Here are my sources and references for my discussion, in episode 19, on violence in/and POTO. Hopefully they’ll help ground and contextualize some of what I talked about in the episode.

Articles which argue that POTO condones or romanticizes violence, including gendered violence/violence against women:

This article is from the Daily News Egypt. https://wwww.dailynewssegypt.com/2019/08/21/phantom-of-the-opera-normalises-violence-in-society/?fbclid=IwAR3HZxdEpReiJ6iC1702aYLA87BybPZxVOdPBbQBBRzZoOdXjBd5yFF1UTo

This one, meanwhile, is from an online publication called Art Is Not A Spectator Sport. http://artisnotaspectatorsport.com/?p=681&fbclid=IwAR32zlycKMpULLkBc7i4X6bnaEjbZ1u3DQYdFsWWeLQ44N3MPEqRlG90Vjk

And this one is from a blog called A Magical World Of Words, dedicated to calling out and fighting violence against women in the arts and media. https://amagicalworldofwords.blogspot.com/2018/01/romanticised-abuse-phantom-of-opera.html?fbclid=IwAR04_4YX7koKNUOElUTDsH8FxdEjaFyIG3PnJWTtgMZj_DjbSvoYC3wKLHs

These articles have provoked some interesting discussion in various Phan forums! I’ve seen these discussions mainly in Phan groups on Facebook, but I’m sure they’re happening elsewhere as well.

And here is the video by Lindsay Ellis in which she discusses the Gerik (the 2004 movie), and points out the issue of how the murder of Joseph Buquet raises the stakes from nasty pranks to serious violence. Her discussion of that starts at about 36 minutes, and goes to about the 37 minute mark. Although, the rest of the video is definitely worth watching, too, for Ellis’s analysis of Joel Schumacher’s use of cinematic technique. Though, heads-up, she gives the film a thorough shredding!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-m5I_5Vnh6A

And here are a bunch of articles on Transformative Justice. Content warning, though. These articles do make reference to violence, including gendered violence/violence against women and sexual violence including against children. Although, they don’t discuss anything in explicit terms or detail.

This article, from brilliant and amazing Queer Disabled activist Mia Mingus, gives a brief overview of what TJ is all about. https://leavingevidence.wordpress.com/2019/01/09/transformative-justice-a-brief-description/

As does this article from Teen Vogue. https://www.teenvogue.com/story/transformative-justice-explained

And this article, from the Transformative Justice Collective of Berlin, gives brief definitions of both community accountability and transformative justice. The language is a bit academic, but pretty concise and informative. Plus, the page also has links to other TJ resources and groups. https://www.transformativejustice.eu/en/what-are-ca-and-tj/

This blog-post, from the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault, gives another good, in-depth but accessible overview of TJ. And it also provides links to lots of excellent resources and examples of TJ in action. https://www.calcasa.org/2017/04/what-does-transformative-justice-look-like-survivor-focused-trauma-informed-community-accountability-to-ending-sexual-violence/

Finally, this extended article from Generation Five, a group working to end sexual violence against children, does a really awesome deep-dive into the principles and practice of transformative justice! http://www.generationfive.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/G5_Toward_Transformative_Justice-Document.pdf

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Info About the French Concert Production Discussed In Episode 18! https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/info-about-the-french-language-phantom Mon, 01 Jun 2020 18:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com a7dd3d63-b78d-4129-81c7-57b479544085 Here's a bunch of info about the French Language production I reviewed in Episode 18. Here’s some info about the in-concert production itself!

https://theatrestdenis.com/fr/spectacle/le-fantome-de-lopera/ (Note, this is in French)

And here’s an article from Broadway World about it! (Includes a video of the French-language commercial for the show.) https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/VIDEO-THE-PHANTOM-OF-THE-OPERA-In-Concert-To-Make-Montreal-French-Language-Debut-20191022

Here are a bunch of reviews of the show, all of which seem to indicate that it was well received by critics and audiences!

https://myscena.org/la-scena-musicale-team/le-fantome-de-lopera-opening-night-team-review/ (in English)

https://www.ludwig-van.com/montreal/2020/01/09/critique-fantome-de-lopera-theatre-st-denis-immense-plaisir-langue-de-gaston-leroux/ (in French)

https://www.journaldemontreal.com/2020/01/08/le-fantome-de-lopera-somptueux-meme-sans-artifices (also in French)

https://www.ledevoir.com/culture/musique/570565/le-fantome-de-l-opera-instruments-de-l-amour (in French as well)

https://www.journaldequebec.com/2020/01/18/un-fantome-bien-en-voix (in French, too)

An article largely focussing on the chap who played Raoul (also in French) https://www.lequotidien.com/arts/le-fantome-de-lopera-un-role-de-reve-pour-michael-girard-b4231d9634198bd21b8e8da105d534b7

And here are a couple of video-clips from the production. Alas, couldn’t find any of the Title Song or of the hilarious Carlotta. In fact, these two were all I could find. But you may here what I mean about the operatic voices of Christine and the Phantom!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeKTlnpLLUk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldy_oa4jxfw

Anyway, as I said in the episode, I really hope they bring a French-language Phantom back to Canada, preferably as a full production this time! That would be incredibly awesome!! Uh, but I also really hope they take some of the suggestions offered in this episode (number 18), as, IMO, the production would be the better for it. That said, though, the French reviewers above seemed to like many of the elements of the production that I didn’t find worked, particularly the operatic vocal casting and the fact that it used minimal sets and staging. They liked the fact that that put the emphasis on the text and the music without the distraction of elaborate sets.

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Show Notes For Episode 17 - When All Is Lost https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/show-notes-ep-17-when-all-is-lost Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:00:00 -0500 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com 5e824426-91c8-4a5f-a4cf-8004ac8e43ea The show-notes, finally, for episode 17 in which I reviewed and analyzed the Phanfic When All Is Lost by Quiet2885. So to find the Phanfic I reviewed in Episode 17, When All Is Lost by Quiet2885, you can go to:

https://www.fanfiction.net/s/2942105/1/When-All-is-Lost

And if you want to check out their other Phanfics, which I can’t recommend highly enough that you do, you can find them at the author’s profile on Fanfiction.net at the link below. All their Phics, but especially their long-form stories, will really challenge you to think about Phantom and the world in ways you might not have before!

https://www.fanfiction.net/u/731205/Quiet2885

To learn more about the concept of environmental justice that I talked about in the episode, see the following:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_justice (although, heads-up, you’ll have to scroll down a ways to find the actual start of the article.) Lots of great info there!

See also: https://www.reimaginerpe.org/ejprinciples

and https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/oct/21/what-is-environmental-injustice-and-why-is-the-guardian-covering-it

and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dREtXUij6_c Keep watching after this first video, as it’s part of a whole series.

In addition, the film A Fierce Green Fire does an excellent job of laying out the history of the environmental movement and the shift to an environmental justice orientation.

See https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1539489/

Also, the book This Changes Everything: Capitalism Vs the Climate by Naomi Klein does an excellent job laying out this concept and its history as they apply to the climate crisis.

See https://naomiklein.org/this-changes-everything/

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Reference Notes for Episode 16 Discussion of Haunting https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/notes-for-episode-16-discussion-of-haunting Tue, 17 Dec 2019 20:00:00 -0500 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com ea99af47-aeff-4494-abde-664bdd7d2240 The sources I was referring to in my discussion of haunting in POTO in episode 16. Here are the references for episode 16 where I talked about haunting.

Gordon, Avery F. (2008) Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination. Minneapolis, Mn. University of Minnesota Press.

The book is an in-depth, deeply poetic exploration of haunting as the on-going effects of trauma and injustice that refuse to just die or be silent. As I said in the episode, I’m going to be thinking about it and how what the book says pertains to Phantom for a very long time!!

Erik/The Phantom’s having been driven into the shadows:

“Besides, was he not as ugly as ever? He dreamed of creating, for his own use, a dwelling unknown to the rest of the earth where he could hide from men’s eyes for all time. … Poor, unhappy Erik. Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be some one like everybody else. But he was too ugly, and he had to hide his genius, or use it to play tricks with. When, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind. He had a heart that could have held the empire of the world. And in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Oh yes, we must needs pity the Opera Ghost.” (Leroux/Damatos trans. epilogue).

“Hounded out by everyone, met with hatred everywhere, no kind words from anyone, no compassion anywhere! Christine, Christine, why? Why?” (Lloyd Webber, Hart and Stilgo Act II scene 8).

In Leroux, and to some extent in Kay, too, Erik uses his “deformity” as part of his Opera Ghost persona, playing on its power to repulse and frighten.  This is implied in the passages in Leroux (Damatos trans.) in which characters other than Christine are described seeing him around the Opera (Joseph Buquet’s description of having seen him given in Chapter 1, when Erik crashes Debienne’s and Poligny’s retirement gala dinner in chapter 3), or when he crashes the masquerade in chapter 9.  It’s also suggested in Chapter 5 of Leroux when Raoul confronts Erik in the cemetery at Peros.  In all these instances, he’s described as having a “Death’s head” like a skull, which, we learn in chapter 12, is his actual face.  And in chapter 21 (I believe), the Persian describes Erik wearing a false nose when going out in public (as in chapter 3 when Erik crashes the gala), which the Persian describes as rendering Erik almost tolerable to look at.  Whereas, when he’s with Christine, Erik wears a full mask, exactly because he does not want to frighten or repulse her (Leroux/Damatos trans. chapter 12).  And Erik’s home, meanwhile, can be read  as at once an attempt to replicate a “respectable” bourgeois home, a tomb in which he has prematurely buried himself, and a self-tormenting reminder of “what he is” and what he believes he cannot have (see Leroux/Damatos trans. Chapters 12 and 26).

In ALW, by contrast, the Phantom makes his mask part of his Phantom persona rather than using his “deformity” to repulse and frighten. And he fashions his Phantom persona as closer to that of romantic/romanticized outlaw rather than grotesque apparition. This can be seen especially in Act I scenes 4 and 5, and also that here his home - his “Lair” - is implied to be part of his Phantom persona rather than being separate from it.

For images of the Phantom’s very romanticized-outlaw look, including of his “Lair”, and of course for the full libretto, see Perry, George (1987). The Complete Phantom of the Opera. Pavillion Books Ltd.

Things that can be read as Erik’s/The Phantom’s demands for redress/compensation/reparations: his “salary” of 20,000 francs a month (Leroux/Damatos trans. Epilogue, ALW Act I scenes 1 and 7), and his demand that the Opera perform his Don Juan Triumphant in ALW (Act II scenes 1 and 3). These demands, although it’s not stated explicitly, directly address the ways Erik/The Phantom has been excluded from the mainstream economy and from artistic recognition because of the prejudice against his “deformity”. Whereas, his demands for Christine’s love, while wrongly acted on, seek to address the ways he’s been excluded from the social fabric of friendship and family (Leroux/Damatos trans. Chapters 22-Epilogue, Lloyd Webber, Hart and Stilgoe Act I scenes 6 and 10, Act II scenes 8 and 9).

My discussions of the ways music and music education had been (more or less) democratized by the time POTO takes place, and of the ensuing cultural conversation about representation that began then and continues to this day, come from my recollection of my music-history courses back in undergrad. However, below, at least, is some info on the Verismo school of opera that was taking off just shortly after the time POTO seems to be set, and just before the time of the publication of the original Leroux novel. Note that, although the “official”, self-styled “verismo” movement got going a bit after the time when Phantom takes place, it was preceded by earlier literary, artistic and musical trends during that period as well as contributing to the artistic, philosophical and political conversations that followed it. Also, although the Verismo movement itself was quite small, it was the more radical (for its time) edge of a broader movement towards using opera/theatre to tell the stories of common people rather than the elite.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verismo_(music)

https://www.freep.com/story/sponsor-story/michigan-opera-theatre/2018/04/04/opera-and-cultural-change-understanding-verismo-tosca/451064002/

https://www.roh.org.uk/news/a-blanket-term-misused-what-is-and-isnt-verismo

Note, none of these articles mention Puccini’s La Boheme, but I would argue that it definitely forms part of this movement toward “realism” in opera because of its portrayal of the passions and struggles of ordinary people - struggling artists, workers, minorities, people dying of consumption (aka tuberculosis which was among the leading killers of the poor at the time).

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Show Notes/References for Episode 15 on the Lawrence Connor Production https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/show-notes-references-for-episode-15 Thu, 14 Nov 2019 18:00:00 -0500 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com df205e96-ae90-4a64-883f-65563ab624f3 The references for my dissection of the Lawrence Connor production/s of Phantom in episode 15. Below are the references for my dissection of Lawrence Connor’s re-staged and redesigned production/s of Phantom in episode 15, so you can all see where I’m getting what I said about it/them from. Though, of course, I also have to hugely thank my Mom (Ysabeault of WAG Productions.org) for going with me to see the U.S. tour when it came to Ottawa in 2017, and for doing such a great job describing the sets and staging!

Excellent pictures and descriptions of the original production, plus, of course, the full libretto, can be found in:

Perry, George (1987). The Complete Phantom of the Opera. Pavilion Books Ltd.

Pictures of and information about the restaged and redesigned U.S. tour can be found at:

https://ustour.thephantomoftheopera.com/#_ga=2.14382327.1393122131.1573709487-340540236.1538848129

“Professional” critics whose reviews I read for episode 15:

Broadway World: https://www.broadwayworld.com/national-tours/article/BWW-Review-THE-PHANTOM-OF-THE-OPERA-at-Paramount-Theatre-20180811

Laexcites.com https://laexcites.com/2019/07/13/review-the-phantom-of-the-opera-north-american-tour/

The San Diego Union Tribune: https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/entertainment/theater/sd-me-review-phantom-20180825-story.html

The above article contains reference to the multi-compartmental drum which contains the sets being a visual analogue to the Phantom’s mind.

DC Metro Theatre Arts: https://dcmetrotheaterarts.com/2016/07/23/review-phantom-opera-kennedy-center-opera-house/

Beacon Journal: https://www.beaconjournal.com/news/20190410/review-reimagined-phantom-of-opera-is-haunting-wondrous

JHP Entertainment: http://jhpentertainment.com/review-phantom-of-the-opera-tpac-2018/

More reviews and info from TheatreGold: http://www.theatregold.com/phantom-of-the-opera-usa-national-tour-reviews-and-dates/

Triangle Arts and Entertainment: http://triangleartsandentertainment.org/2014/10/reimagined-version-of-andrew-lloyd-webbers-the-phantom-of-the-opera-will-haunt-dpac-on-oct-8-19/

Greenville News: https://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/entertainment/arts/paul-hyde/2014/05/10/director-gives-phantom-opera-grittier-deeper-feel/8907041/

The above article mentions Connor’s desire to work from the text of the libretto and “ignore the music”.

LA Times: https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-cm-new-improved-phantom-20150708-story.html

The above article discusses in greater depth Connor’s desire to give the show a “grittier”, “darker”, more “realistic” look and feel, including the comparison of the Phantom to a “magpie”.

Phan reviews I read for this episode.

Note the stark contrast to the first set of reviews, particularly in light of the “professional” critics’ assumption (regardless of whether they themselves esteem Phantom or not) that Phans would love the new production!

Lowe, Kayla (2018). “The Phantom of the Opera US Tour: Reimagined or Ruined?”. Author Kayla Lowe. https://authorkaylalowe.wordpress.com/2018/11/05/the-phantom-of-the-opera-us-tour-reimagined-or-ruined/?fbclid=IwAR2GlUMwCc1xH0Ep89StcBI5MeWcrkcrFDCJmjQ-W60BQaM3-IUYByZl9q0

The rest of the Phan reviews came from the Deserted Phans message-board forum.

Review by Scorp of the 2012 U.K tour, also directed by Lawrence Connor and with the same re-staging and redesign: https://desertedphans.forumotion.net/t445-2012-uk-tour-new-production-dir-laurence-connor-starring-joj-olivia-brereton-alt-simon-bailey

A review of the U.S. tour by ToDaaeFor: https://desertedphans.forumotion.net/t607-us-tour-4-1-15-wharton-center-east-lansing-mi-mann-travis-lineberger

A review of a different stop and performance of the U.S. tour by Phantour: https://desertedphans.forumotion.net/t635-us-tour-washington-d-c-august-9-2016

A review of yet another performance by Phantom10906: https://desertedphans.forumotion.net/t613-poto-us-tour-8-30-15-orpheum-theater-san-francisco-ca-ruizu-s-travis-lineberger

Another review of the U.S. tour with discussion from page 19 of the “Broadway Production + US Tour” thread. Scroll down to the post by RobHawkins on Thursday Dec 05, 2013 4:37 am to find the beginning of the discussion, which includes reference (as mentioned in the episode) to people actually walking out of US tour performances.
https://desertedphans.forumotion.net/t467p540-the-broadway-production-us-tour#22128

Page 20 of the “Broadway Production + US Tour” thread on Deserted Phans, with more reviews and discussion. Though, does include a number of Phans who did enjoy the new production.
https://desertedphans.forumotion.net/t467p570-the-broadway-production-us-tour

Note that many of the above reviews make reference, both to Connor’s practice of blocking Christine and the Phantom/Christine and Raoul far apart even during romantic scenes (Act I scenes 5 and 10, Act II scene 5 in particular), and to his putting the Phantom down on the same level as the other characters (Act I scene 10, Act II scenes 1 and 5). They also make frequent reference to the changes Connor has made to the blocking of the Title Song and Music of the Night (Act I scenes 4 and 5), the first unmasking (Act I scene 6) and the Final Lair (Act II scene 9), particularly flagging the latter two for the effects those changes have on the story-telling.

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Show/Reference notes for Episode 14 - Queer/Crip Desire in the ALW Phantom! https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/reference-notes-episode-14 Thu, 08 Aug 2019 16:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com be4196b3-7762-4a87-9661-fb94c61ee64f References for my discussion of Queer/-Crip sexuality and Desire in the ALW Phantom in episode 14. Happy 1-year Podiversary! Amount of stage-time given to the various main characters and relationships in the ALW Phantom:

Christine - most of the show (Act I scenes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9 and 10, Act II scenes 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7-9)

The Phantom - Act I scenes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9 and 10, Act II scenes 1, 3, 5, and 6-9. Although, admittedly, in some of these scenes his appearances are only brief, such as Act I scenes 2 and 9.

Christine and the Phantom together - Act I scenes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and sort of 9 and 10, Act II scenes 1, 3 sort of, 5, and 7-9. Although, in some scenes, such as Il Muto (Act I scene 9) and the second “notes” scene (Act II scene 3), they’re both present in the scene but not interacting.

Raoul - Act I scenes 1 (though, in the stage-version, he only appears at the end of Think of Me, not during the Hannibal rehearsal as in the Gerik), 3 and 8-10, Act II all scenes. Although, in many scenes, although he’s present, Raoul is not necessarily the primary focus of the action.

Raoul and Christine together - Act I scenes 1, 3, 9 and 10, Act II scenes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. And indeed, I would argue that the only scenes which really focus on interaction between Raoul and Christine are Act I scenes 3 and 10 and part of Act II scenes 1 and 3. In all other cases, they’re either together in the scene but not actually interacting much, and/or their interactions are embedded within larger action - for example their interaction in Masquerade (Act II scene 1, Wandering Child (Act II scene 5), or Act II scenes 7 and 9 (Don Juan Triumphant and the Final Lair respectively).

The above info is, of course, drawn from the scene summary and libretto found in George Perry’s superb 1987 The Complete Phantom of the Opera.

“'I was watching a BBC programme called The Skin Horse about people who were physically incapacitated, or deformed, a series of interviews with quadriplegics, Thalidomide victims, talking about what it was like, and I sensed that the thing that united them all was a very normal, healthy sexuality. And that's what Maria and I wanted to put up there, and it affected the design of the proscenium, with its statues intertwined in some moment of passion which the audiences sees and absorbs.”
(Perry, George (1987). The Complete Phantom of the Opera. Pavilion Books Ltd. pg 74-75.

Note. It is unclear whether the above quote is from Andrew Lloyd Webber himself or from Hal Prince.

Note also: the design of the proscenium, referenced in the quote above, has been criticized for displaying “acts of passion” that do not appear to be consentual (Kendall-Tackett, Kathleen 2018. The Phantom of the Opera: A Social History of the World’s Most Popular Musical).

However, even with the above-referenced critique of the proscenium design, it is interesting to note the consciously stated intent to portray the Phantom as having “a very normal, healthy sexuality”. Because, as noted in the episode, this is extremely unusual in terms of the ways Disabled/Deformed/Disfigured characters are typically portrayed!

And as can be seen in the later half of this 2010 (rather hilarious) BBC documentary on the making of the show, the sexuality, sensuality and desire in the ALW Phantom owes as much to Hal Prince (director), Maria Bjornson (set and costume design), Gillian Lynn (choreographer), and Michael Crawford (the amazing actor who originated the role) as it does to Lloyd Webber himself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpVTAvazjpg&t=875s

In particular, note how Michael Crawford says explicitly that, when creating the character in rehearsals, he didn’t feel the Phantom as a monster, but as a man who loves deeply and has deep emotions, but also how he and Sarah Brightman bring sensuality and sexuality to the character.

McRuer, Robert and Mollow, Anna, eds. (2012) Sex and Disability. Duke University Press.

The above book discusses the stereotypes and tropes referred to in the episode which form the conventional depictions of Disabled/Deformed/Disfigured people’s and characters’ sexualities. Ely Clare also discusses them in his superb book Exile and Pride (2015 edition, see below).

Clare, Ely (2015) Exile and Pride: A Journey of Disability, Queerness and Liberation. Duke University Press.

(See the “links and resources” page for more books and articles that deal with this.)

And here’s a link to that really excellent, Queer, gender-bent period-piece retelling Phanfic I mentioned in the episode! It’s called The Music Lovers, and it’s definitely worth checking out!

https://www.fanfiction.net/s/13002836/1/The-Music-Lovers

There also at least used to be a whole bunch of very good, if relatively short, modern retelling slash Phanfics by some one who went by Lucifer Rosemont (not sure if I have the second part of that spelled right). But, unfortunately, I can’t find the link to their profile now or I’d post it!

Also, one of the best slash Phanfics I ever read, also a modern retelling, was a Phic called Sakikaeru by some one who, then, went by the handle Hikari no Tsubasa (all hyphenated together I think). It set the story in a slowly emerging Queer relationship amidst the 90s/early 2000s Visual Kai(sp?) music scene in contemporary Tokyo. It was brilliant! Unfortunately, though, it was left unfinished and seems to have also disappeared from Fanfiction.net. I really hope they some day finish it, though!!

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RIP Kevin Jackson! https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/rip-kevin-jackson Sat, 27 Jul 2019 19:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com 6b3561d1-c081-4653-8145-0b3a1fa91d5c A brief memorial note in honour of Kevin Jackson, co-founder and organizer of @TDPM, who recently passed away very suddenly. RIP! Sharing some very sad news. Kevin Jackson, co-founder and co-organizer of the Toronto Disability Pride March @TDPM, whom I had hoped to have on the show at some point because he was also a long-time Phan, recently passed away very suddenly. Huge condolences to all the friends, family and colleagues he leaves behind, and especially to his fiancee! And may Kevin rest in peace/power.

Also, his fiancee is raising funds to cover the cost of his burial and celebration-of-life. So if folks can contribute, that would be a wonderful way to show support and solidarity to her at this really sad and difficult time! You can donate at the URL below.

https://fundrazr.com/e1XIM6?ref=ab_18EqWJTutyC18EqWJTutyC

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Episode 12: What Makes You Beautiful! https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/ep-12-what-makes-you-beautiful Mon, 03 Jun 2019 14:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com 006bb642-2c9e-4ac0-8020-96e559c2a789 All the places you can buy Bridget Liang's awesome young adult novel What Makes You Beautiful! So here, again, are all the places where you can buy Bridget’s book!

First of all, you can order it directly from the publisher in print and, I believe, in ebook. http://www.lorimer.ca/childrens/Book/3083/What-Makes-You-Beautiful.html

And then, of course, you can find it on Amazon as well. https://www.amazon.ca/What-Makes-Beautiful-Bridget-Liang/dp/145941411X

And last but certainly not least, you can find it on the Kindle store! https://www.amazon.ca/What-Makes-Beautiful-Bridget-Liang-ebook/dp/B07NLDGRRM/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=What+Makes+You+Beautiful&qid=1555442351&s=digital-text&sr=1-1

It’ll also come up on Kindle if you keyword search “Phantom of the Opera”, but you’ll have to scroll down a bunch of pages to find it. That’s how I found it, though!

Also, sadly, this book is not available on Audible.com or any of that, as it has not yet been produced as an audiobook. But I hope some day it will be! I’ve mentioned it to Bridget, and they seem open to the idea. They certainly understand the need from an accessibility POV! But it’d be a matter of finding appropriate readers (though, I’d love for Bridget to read it themself), and, of course, funding the production. But hopefully we can make that happen one of these days!! Because, the first-person narration style of the book in a very casual, conversational, young adult voice really lends itself beautifully, I think, to an audiobook rendering.

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Show/Bibliographic notes for Episode 11 on Femininity in POTO. https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/notes-for-ep-11-on-femininity Tue, 28 May 2019 17:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com d2979fb0-b839-4835-9c65-6cb85035ca30 The notes and references for episode 11 on the "good girl/bad girl" binary in POTO. The “good girl/bad girl” binary (also variously called the “Madonna/whore” binary and/or the “Angel/whore” binary):

A good, if perhaps somewhat uncritical, overview from Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madonna–whore_complex

A somewhat more critical overview of this idea from TVtropes.org, including examples from contemporary popular culture https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/MadonnaWhoreComplex?fbclid=IwAR0AsbcX9ZoGx2hF523q3SwbiG_MCBorO_RECmT-A3sV01UwgxKYSsn_85Q

A really excellent example of the “angel/whore” binary in Raoul’s thinking with regard to Christine can be found in Leroux (Damatos) chapters 8 and 9.

Christine as typifying the “good girl”:

Leroux (Damatos translation) especially chapters 5, 11 and 12, though also 2, 7, 10, 22-26.

All these chapters emphasize Christine’s almost child-like innocence and naivety, her piety - both religious and to the memory of her father, her prettiness, her “purity”, and her docility except when her honour or “purity” is questioned or threatened.

ALW Act I scenes 2 and especially 10, Act II scenes 3 and 5.

Notice how, in the above-referenced scenes from ALW, Christine’s vocal line is set firmly in a soprano register, but is also very plain. Indeed, except for the cadenza at the end of Think Of Me (Act I scene 1) and the vocalizations that cap off the title song (Act I scene 4), her part is devoid of embellishment or ornamentation.

Carlotta as the “Bad Girl/woman”:

Leroux (Damatos translation) chapters 7 especially, and 13.

ALW Act I scenes 1, especially 8 and 9, Act II scenes 3 and 4.

Notice how, in these scenes from ALW, Carlotta’s part is often not only very high in range, but elaborate, especially in the “Notes/Prima Donna” scene (Act I scene 8). Her vocal lines are extremely showy, being full of ornamentation and embellishment. This can be read as representing her ego and ambition in contrast to Christine’s innocence and modesty.

Description of Carlotta as “…the celebrated but heartless and soulless diva…” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 7)

Quotes perhaps alluding to Leroux Carlotta’s sexuality, and to a connection between sexuality and her ambition:

“(Christine) had played a good Siebel to Carlotta’s rather too splendidly material Marguerite.” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 2)

“Thenceforth, certain of herself, certain of her friends in the house, certain of her voice and her success, fearing nothing, Carlotta flung herself into her part without restraint of modesty. She was no longer Marguerite, she was Carmen.” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 7).

Some background on the above-referenced opera Carmen by George Bizet. In the said opera, the “gipsy” Carmen (the bad girl) seduces the soldier Don Jose away from his (good girl) fiancee Micaela, and is ultimately murdered by him in a jealous rage after she becomes bored with him and repeatedly rebuffs his efforts to get back together with her. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmen

By contrast, the opera Faust by Charles Gounod, referenced, and indeed quoted explicitly, in chapters 2, 7 and 13 of Leroux/Damatos. It tells the story of a “good girl”, Marguerite, who is seduced by Faust, but who is ultimately saved by her repentance and return to piety. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faust_(opera)

Kay, Susan (1990,2005). Phantom: The Story of His Life. Llumina Press.

Erik’s mother, Luciana and the Khanum as variations on the “bad” women in Susan Kay’s Phantom:

Madeleine, Erik’s mother - pages 3-76

Luciana - pages 115-165

Notice how neither of the women described in these sections of the book are actively malicious. They’re just spoiled little princesses who are used to getting their way because of their beauty, and to never having to deal with anything unpleasant or challenging. Being pampered and indulged has made them shallow and selfish. Nevertheless, they are the “bad girl light” as it were - spoiled and selfish but not truly wicked, and capable of “reform” if they can learn the “virtues” of charity and unselfishness.

The Khanum - pages 166-260

Notice how this woman, by contrast, is portrayed as truly depraved - not merely spoiled and selfish, though she is that, too, but actively malicious. She is the classic femme fatale, in some ways, - the dark, exotic woman who enjoys using her beauty, power and allure to manipulate men. She is, of course, an expanded version of Leroux’s “little Sultana” (chapters 21-25 and Epilogue).

Note: this portrayal of the “bad woman”, especially the femme fatale, as the exotic woman from the East is very problematic even as it is extremely common in Western literature and popular culture. And yes, that will be addressed in a future episode!!

Christine as the “good girl” in Kay: pages 336-428, 429-455.

Notice how, unlike Madeleine and Luciana, Christine isn’t so much spoiled (though you do sense a bit of that) as simply sheltered - kept a child long after she should have been allowed to start growing into an emotionally mature adult. Like Madeleine and Luciana, though, as part of that sheltering, she has never had to confront anything unpleasant, challenging or emotionally complex prior to the death of her father. Or rather, she has been prevented - held back - from doing so.

(Note, I’m working from the Kindle ebook version of Kay’s novel because that’s what I have ready access to)

Notice how none of these models of femininity produce emotionally mature adults capable of loving and handling some one like Erik with all his trauma and needs - not the “bad” women obviously, because they’re too shallow/ruthless/self-centred. But not the “good” women either, because they have been held back from developing emotional maturity in order to produce the naive, innocent, docile, child-like personality required of the “good girl”. So they lack the tools necessary to cope with emotional and sexual complexity. Thus, both sides of the “good girl/bad girl” binary do harm and, in fact, contribute to Erik’s marginalization. However, as mentioned, I think this critique of the “good girl/bad girl” binary is implicit, though likely unintentionally so, in all three versions of POTO - Leroux, ALW and Kay.

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Show-Notes for Episode 7 On Obsession! https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/show-notes-episode-7-on-obsession Fri, 16 Nov 2018 14:00:00 -0500 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com c356adbc-a740-43a2-899d-928206a50613 References for the stuff I talked about in episode 7 on Phanship and obsession. Definitions of “obsession” from various online dictionaries, both those I mentioned in the episode and some extras.

From Merriam Webster’s dictionary online https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/obsession

From Dictionary.com: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/obsession

Collins Dictionary: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/obsession

The Oxford Dictionary online: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/obsession

UrbanDictionary.com: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=obsession

The Wikipedia page about obsession: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsession

And the book on the history of obsession in Western thought and medicine that I referred to was:

Davis, Lennard J. (2008) Obsession: A History. University of Chicago Press.

The following article “You Know You’re Addicted to POTO When…” is based on a thread from the old and venerable, but sadly no longer online, PhantomoftheOpera.com message-board. LOL And I can tell you that there’s some truth in this list, as I’ve done quite a few of these and was like “good idea” at several others! (Note, you have to either answer or skip the blasted survey question to read the full article.)

“You Know You’re Addicted to POTO When” http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/the-phantom-of-the-opera/articles/11108/title/know-youre-addicted-poto-when

And here’s another, similar discussion thread. LOL And yes, some of these I’ve done, too!

“You Know You’re Obsessed With POTO When” http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/the-phantom-of-the-opera/forum/post/40908/title/know-youre-obsessed-with-poto-when

A similar listing, this time posted as a story on Fanfiction.net. LOL This time I haven’t done so many of these myself!

https://www.fanfiction.net/s/4887278/1/You-know-you-re-obsessed-with-PotO-when

And there’s lots more such out there! Just Google “You know you’re obsessed with Phantom when”.

Here, meanwhile, are some typical discussions of obsession in the story of Phantom itself. I’ll be honest, though, I find them a bit shallow for the most part, mostly because they seem to lack an awareness of Disability/Mad history with which to contextualize their analysis. Not to mention, of course, the influence of the Gerik!

http://www.blondiemarie.com/blog/obsession-and-the-phantom-of-the-opera

Hopkins, Vicki (2008). “Obsession”. Lessons From The Phantom of the Opera. http://thephantomslessons.blogspot.com/2008/03/obsession.html

Note. This latter piece by Vicki Hopkins has since been published as part of her book Lessons From the Phantom of the Opera, which is a collection of her essays from this blog. I have yet to read it, though, so I don’t know if the version of this article in the book is the same.

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Show-Notes for Episode 4: Turning From True Beauty https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/show-notes-for-episode-4-turning-from-true-beauty Sun, 26 Aug 2018 16:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com 53585c01-f7d7-4007-8f8c-f5bcfec3a940 Notes and references for episode 4 in which I discuss the Gerik. First of all, see Perry as usual for the complete published libretto of the stage-musical, as well as for stunning still photographs from the original London production!

Perry, George (1987). The Complete Phantom of the Opera . London: Pavilion Books Limited.

  1. The reduction of the Gerik Phantom’s deformity down to “the glorified sunburn”.

    See chapters/tracks 29-30 through 34 of the DVD.

    See also the below links to Operafantomet’s Tumblr for some good photographic comparisons between the Gerik and a number of stage Phantoms.

Search Result: Deformity: Tumblr.com. http://operafantomet.tumblr.com/search/deformity

“have you done any photosets of varying Phantom's deformity?”: Tumblr.com. http://operafantomet.tumblr.com/post/106595238487/have-you-done-any-photosets-of-varying-phantoms

Search Results: 2004 Movie Deformity: Tumblr.com http://operafantomet.tumblr.com/search/2004+movie+deformity

  1. Changes to the Phantom’s back-story in the Gerik.

    See chapter/track 22 of the DVD vs Act II scene 2 of the stage-version libretto (see Perry). Compare Mme. Giry’s lines in both scenes, and also compare the history Mme. Giry recounts in Act II scene 2 of the stage-version vs the flashback in the Gerik.

  2. Changes to the teacher/student relationship between the Phantom and Christine and its back-story in the Gerik.

    See chapter/track 6 of the DVD vs Act I scene 2 of the stage-version libretto for where dialogue and visuals have been added in the Gerik, suggesting both that the Phantom has been Christine’s Angel of Music for much longer, and that she believes he may actually be the spirit of her father come back to teach and guide her.

    See also chapter/track 9 of the DVD vs Act I scene 4 for comparison of the Title Song. Note that the stage-version contains four verses, whereas the Gerik version contains only the first three. Thus, the critical lines “In all your fantasies you always knew that man and mystery were both in you” are removed from the Gerik.

  3. “Revealing the magicians secrets” - showing how the Phantom does his tricks and illusions, thus having the audience participate in unmasking him.

    See chapter/track 3 of the DVD, where you see the Phantom’s hands untie the rope that causes the backdrop to fall onto Carlotta, compared to Act I scene 1 of the stage-version libretto, where you just see the backdrop fall and not how it was engineered.

    See chapter/track 13 of the DVD, too, where you see what the Phantom is doing while his latest note is being read, vs Act I scene 8 and Act II scene 3 where you just hear his disembodied voice.

    Similarly, see chapter/track 15 of the DVD vs Act I scene 9 of the stage-version libretto for a comparison of the two “Il Muto” scenes. Again, on the DVD you see what the Phantom is doing - how he makes Carlotta “croak”, etc. Whereas, in the stage-version, you only hear his voice.

    Also, see chapters/tracks 16 and 28 into 29 of the DVD, in which you actually see the Phantom commit the murders of Joseph Buquet and Piangi, vs Act I scene 9 and Act II scene 7 of the stage-version libretto where you simply see the results.

    Note, however, chapters 9, 11, and 25 of the Gerik DVD, in which it is implied that Christine is seeing things that are not actually there (the beautiful fairy-land of the catacombs and the light emerging from the mausoleum) without its being made clear whether this is simply her imagination or some sort of illusion or hypnosis by the Phantom.

  4. Learn To Be Lonely.

    See chapter/track 36 of the DVD, the end credits, for the only new song added to Phantom in the Gerik, entitled “Learn To Be Lonely”.

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Show-notes part 1 for episode 3 - That Man And Mystery: POTO and the Trouble With Normal part 2 https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/show-notes-part-1-for-episode-3-that-man-and-mystery-poto-and-the-trouble-with-normal-part-2 Sat, 28 Jul 2018 01:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com d08918a3-0b6f-45a0-9c1b-420460362ee3 Some of the quotes and sources referenced in episode 3 on the ALW stage-musical and the issue of "normalcy". I decided to go ahead and post some of the sources I referenced in Episode 3, those that don’t require hyperlinks, while I wait for Fireside to fix the accessibility issue with the body-text form fields. Because, the references that are just quotes and bibliographic info I can simply copy and paste! So look out for part 2 of these show-notes at some point, which will contain links to some references on the culture and politics I referred to in the episode. That’ll be up as soon as humanly possible!

Perry, George. (1987) The Complete Phantom of the Opera . London: Pavilion Books Limited.
(See the section entitled “The Phantom Triumphant” for excellent, hell, stunning pictures of the sets and costumes of the show as originally designed by Maria Bjornson, including the very romantic set of the Phantom’s Lair. Also, see the section after that for the complete published libretto, from which all act and scene references here are taken. Though, actual text is copied down by ear from various cast recordings. So if my punctuation doesn’t quite match the libretto, that’s why! I need to do some adjusting to my scanned version of the libretto from Perry so that it’s easier to navigate with my screen-reader to quickly find the passages I want.)

Quotes emphasizing the Phantom’s yearning for compassion rather than normalcy, and his rejection of pity:

“(Phantom) Hounded out by everyone, met with hatred everywhere, no kind word from anyone, no compassion anywhere! Christine, Christine, why? Why?” (ALW Act II scene 8. Correction, because I think I said scene 9 in the episode. My bad!)

“(Phantom) This face which earned a mother’s fear and loathing! A mask, my first unfeeling scrap of clothing.
Pity comes too late! Turn around and face your fate, an eternity of this before your eyes!” (ALW Act II scene 9)

“(Raoul) ‘… Does that mean nothing? I love her! Show some compassion.’ (Phantom, replying) ‘The world showed no compassion to me.’” (ALW Act II scene 9)

“(Phantom) Too late for turning back, too late for prayers and useless pity!” (ALW Act II scene 9)

Re the wedding dress, see Act I scene 5, containing the song “The Music of the Night”, and Act II scene 9.

Quotes suggesting the Phantom’s Lair as a sanctuary from normalcy, and that he is inviting Christine to share in it:

“I have brought you to the seat of sweet music’s throne… to this kingdom where all must pay homage to music… music…” (ALW Act I scene 5)

Basically all of the lyrics to “The Music of the Night”, although the invitation to share/be his partner is especially present in the final lines - “You alone can make my song take flight - help me make the music of the night…” (ALW Act I scene 5)

Quotes suggesting a conception of normalcy as mediocrity:

“…otherwise, the chorus was entrancing, but the dancing was a lamentable mess!” (ALW Act I scene 8)

“Dear Andre. Re my orchestration, we need another first bassoon. Get a player with tone. And that third trombone has to go! The man could not be deafer, so please, preferably one who plays in tune!” (ALW Act II scene 3)

“Dear Firmin. Vis-a-vis my opera, some chorus-members must be sacked. If you could find out which has a sense of pitch! Wisely, though, I’ve managed to assign a rather minor role to those who cannot act!” (ALW Act II scene 3)

Quotes emphasizing sharing/companionship in sanctuary from normalcy rather than “success”:

The final two verses of the Title Song “The Phantom of the Opera” (ALW Act I scene 4), though I’ll talk about why in a future episode.

Also, again, basically all of the lyrics to “The Music of the Night”, but especially the final lines - “You alone can make my song take flight - help me make the music of the night…” (ALW Act I scene 5)

“Pitiful creature of darkness, what kind of life have you known? God give me courage to show you you are not alone!” (ALW Act II scene 9)

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Show notes for Episode 2 - Poor, Unhappy Erik: POTO and the Trouble With Normal part 1. https://inthislabyrinth.fireside.fm/articles/show-notes-for-episode-2-poor-unhappy-erik-poto-and-the-trouble-with-normal-part-1- Thu, 12 Jul 2018 07:00:00 -0400 PhantomFemmeVoiceblend@gmail.com 5ed7763a-c525-4406-a2e2-42af8d76643d The quotes and sources I referenced in episode 2. References on the history and development of “normal”:

Davis, Lennard J. (1995) Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness, and the Body. Verso books.

Davis, Lennard J. “Bodies of Difference: Politics, Disability, and Representation”. In Snyder, Sharon L, Brenda Jo Brueggeman and Rosemarie Garland-Thomson eds. (2002) Disability Studies: Enabling the Humanities. Modern Language Association of America, New York. pp 100-106

Quotes from and references for Leroux:

Perry, George. (1987) The Complete Phantom of the Opera . London: Pavilion Books Limited.
For some brief background on Gaston Leroux and the publication of the original novel.

Leroux, Gaston. (1911, 1988) The Phantom of the Opera. Alexander Damatos trans. Unicorn Publishing House.

Quotes expressing or referencing Erik’s desire for “normalcy” but inability to ever attain it:

“I can’t go on living like this - like a mole in a burrow. … and now I want to live like everybody else. I want to have a wife like everybody else, and take her out on Sundays. I have invented a mask that makes me look like anybody. People will not even turn around in the streets.” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 22).

“… but I am very tired of it. I’m sick and tired … of living like a mountebank in a house with a false bottom. … I want to have a nice, quiet flat, with ordinary doors and windows, and a wife inside it like anybody else.” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 23)

“Then, (after having had to flee from Persia and the Ottoman empire because he knew too much) tired of his adventurous, formidable and monstrous life, he longed to be some one like everybody else. And he became a contractor, like any ordinary contractor, building ordinary houses with ordinary bricks.” (Leroux/Damatos Epilogue).

“When he found himself in the cellars of the enormous playhouse (the opera house which his contracting business had helped build), his artistic, fantastic, wizard nature resumed the upper hand. Besides, was he not as ugly as ever? He dreamed of creating, for his own use, a dwelling unknown to the rest of the earth where he could hide from men’s eyes for all time.” (Leroux/Damatos epilogue).

“Poor, unhappy Erik. Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be some one like everybody else. But he was too ugly, and he had to hide his genius, or use it to play tricks with. When, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind. He had a heart that could have held the empire of the world. And in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Oh yes, we must needs pity the Opera Ghost.” (Leroux/Damatos epilogue).

Descriptions of Erik’s house on the lake:

Christine describes Erik’s drawing-room as “…quite as common-place as any that, at least, had the excuse of not being in the cellars of the Opera.” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 12)

Christine’s description of Erik’s bedroom “I felt as though I were entering the room of a dead person. The walls were all hung with black. But instead of the white trimmings which usually set off that funereal upholstery, there was an enormous stave of music with the notes of the Dies Ire many times repeated. In the middle of the room was a canopy from which hung curtains of red, brocaded stuff. And under the canopy, an open coffin.” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 12)

“… the precision of the details of that quiet little middle-class room seemed to have been invented for the express purpose of puzzling the mind of the mortal rash enough to stray into that abode of living nightmare - The wooden bedstead, the waxed mahogany chairs, the chest of drawers, those brasses, the little, square antimacassars carefully placed on the back of the chairs, the clock on the mantlepiece, and the harmless looking little ebony caskets at either end, lastly, the whatnot filled with shells, with red pincushions, with mother-of-pearl boats, and an enormous ostrich egg, the whole discretely lighted by a shaded lamp standing on a small, round table. This collection of ugly, peaceable, reasonable furniture at the bottom of the opera cellars bewildered the imagination more than all the late fantastic happenings. And the figure of the masked man seemed all the more formidable in this old-fashioned, neat and trim little frame.” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 26)

Quotes emphasizing Erik’s experience of exclusion as the source of his “madness”:

“He ran away at an early age from his father’s house where his ugliness was a subject of horror and terror to his parents.” (Leroux/Damatos Epilogue)

“Why did you want to see me? Oh, mad Christine, who wanted to see me when my own father never saw me! And when my mother, so as not to see me, made me a present of my first mask” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 12).

“My mother, Daroga, my poor, unhappy mother would never let me kiss her. She used to run away and throw me my mask. Nor any other woman, ever, ever!” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 26)

“His horrible, unparalleled and repulsive ugliness put him without the pale of humanity. And it often seemed to me that, for this reason, he no longer believed that he had any duty toward the human race.” (Leroux/Damatos chapter 21)

(“without the pale” being an expression meaning outside/beyond the boundaries in case anyone’s unfamiliar with that.)

“Thinking himself without the pale of humanity, he (Erik) was restrained by no scruples.” (Leroux/Damatos Epilogue)

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